What makes life worth living in the face of death

Stanford internist Lucy Kalanithi is the widow of neurosurgeon and writer Paul Kalanithi, who was diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer at age 36. In Lucy's 2016 TEDMED Talk, she shares the perspective their family gained during Paul's difficult transition from doctor to patient.

Let's talk about dying - Peter Saul

We can't control if we'll die, but we can "occupy death," in the words of Dr. Peter Saul. He calls on us to make clear our preferences for end of life care -- and suggests two questions for starting the conversation. (Filmed at TEDxNewy.)

Lessons from a hospice nurse

 Alia Indrawan is an integrative healing practitioner and intuitive guide based in Bali, Indonesia. She has previously worked as a Hospice Nurse, helping people with terminal illness to die gracefully and in peace. She has taken the lessons she's learned from death and dying and now empowers others to become conscious creators of their lives. She is deeply committed to whole-hearted living, where emotional freedom and vulnerability are honored and celebrated. 

How my son's short life made a lasting difference

After Sarah Gray's unborn son Thomas was diagnosed with anencephaly, a terminal condition, she decided to turn her family's tragedy into an extraordinary gift and donate his organs to scientific research. In this tribute to life and discovery, she shares her journey to find meaning in loss and spreads a message of hope for other grieving families. this great video

Rethinking the Bucket List

  Kathleen Taylor is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor with over 20 years of experience in hospice, palliative care, and advance care planning. She currently operates a coaching and consulting practice primarily serving the healthcare, social service and nonprofit sectors. In her career, Kathleen has fostered communication within families, in conference rooms, and in communities. Her intention is to bring her skills and insight regarding clarity and authenticity to every interaction. Kathleen i

Lessons from the Dying

 After an extensive career working as a nurse, Marie-Jo has developed a passion for palliative care. By having an opportunity to work closer with the dying, Marie-Jo has been forced to look inwards and truly question if she knows herself. She discusses three lessons that have given her a unique perspective on why your words matter and how sometimes there is no tomorrow. Understanding why these aspects are important come from a willingness to ask the question “how am I living?”  

Prepare for a good end of life

 Thinking about death is frightening, but planning ahead is practical and leaves more room for peace of mind in our final days. In a solemn, thoughtful talk, Judy MacDonald Johnston shares 5 practices for planning for a good end of life. 

What really matters at the end of life

At the end of our lives, what do we most wish for? For many, it's simply comfort, respect, love. BJ Miller is a hospice and palliative medicine physician who thinks deeply about how to create a dignified, graceful end of life for his patients. Take the time to savor this moving talk, which asks big questions about how we think on death and honor life.

Stories from a home for terminally ill children

 To honor and celebrate young lives cut short, Kathy Hull founded the first freestanding pediatric palliative care facility in the United States, the George Mark Children's House. Its mission: to give terminally ill children and their families a peaceful place to say goodbye. She shares stories brimming with wisdom, joy, imagination and heartbreaking loss. 

I See Dead People: Dreams and Visions of the Dying

Dr. Christopher W. Kerr is the Chief Medical Officer at The Center for Hospice and Palliative Care, where he has worked since 1999. His background in research has evolved from bench science towards the human experience of illness as witnessed from the bedside, specifically patients’ dreams and visions at the end of life. Although medically ignored, these near universal experiences often provide comfort and meaning as well as insight into the life led and the death anticipated.


The corpses that changed my life

Caitlin's first experience in the death industry set off a nine year mission to change how the Western world deals with their dead. In her talk, Caitlin takes us around the world, to demonstrate how other cultures enjoy a more intimate, meaningful relationship with death.